The Decline in Honduras' Health Conditions

In 2014 Honduras was known to be one of the poorest countries in Latin America. With its poverty level rising, health care for Hondurans has been declining. The average life expectancies for Honduran men and women range from 69 years to 72 years, according to the CIA World Factbook. This is due to the high risk of infectious diseases, unhealthy lifestyle and poor living conditions.

While drinking water and sanitation conditions have improved for those living in densely populated areas, those living in rural areas suffer greatly. Around 10.4% of the population still does not have a clean water source and around 20% of the population does not have access to clean sanitation (CIA World Factbook). Without clean sanitation or a clean water source, bacteria and disease are easily transferred through physical or viral contact.

The World Health Organization found that HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis caused up to 20,000 deaths by 2012 due to the inadequate cleanliness of facilities and the inability to receive medical care because they cannot afford it.

Serving at the Crossroads and Manos Amigas are working together to help the citizens of Honduras receive proper medical care even though they cannot afford it. During the last brigade, several patients told a volunteer that the reason they do not seek medical care was because it was too expensive for them due to the cost of travel and treatment. This was heartbreaking for the volunteer to hear, but patients also said that they had heard wonderful stories about the clinic and knew that Manos Amigas would help them get well. 

Brigade volunteers, Nicole Sanders (left in red bandana) and Barb McHugh (right with camera in hand), kept the children of this remote Honduran village occupied while their family members received medical care from the brigade's medical personnel.  

Brigade volunteers, Nicole Sanders (left in red bandana) and Barb McHugh (right with camera in hand), kept the children of this remote Honduran village occupied while their family members received medical care from the brigade's medical personnel.  

Hondurans from a remote village outside La Entrada line up outside a makeshift clinic in their church to receive medical care for the first time.

Hondurans from a remote village outside La Entrada line up outside a makeshift clinic in their church to receive medical care for the first time.